New book helps out youths
July 14, 2004
Linda Phelps
Staff Writer




Every teen at some point questions the advice given by their parents. I can remember thinking how old-fashioned some of my own mother's guidance seemed to be when I was a teenager. Times may have changed but teens have not. Having my own teen, I've gotten the occasional incredulous look after I give advice about issues.

Clinton resident Judy Jackson wanted to find a venue to address issues faced by today's youths so she decided to write a book.

"Having two teenagers and one about to go to college, I began to asked the Lord if I, as a Christian parent, instilled everything that He wanted me to instill into my children so that they could trust the Lord and know the Lord for themselves," Jackson said.

Jackson said she began to think about the issues that trap young people such as drug abuse, fornication and the inability to forgive parents. She began to write about the issues and she said that the Lord gave her poetic words to express her thoughts. Her compilation of poems soon were made into a book titled, "It's a Rap! Rhythm and Poetry for Teens and Young Adults." Jackson hoped that the book contained the lessons she had taught her own children and hoped those lessons could also benefit others.

Jackson's daughter, Amanda, joined in the effort and added to the book Mandi's Minutes, a youthful perspective to the lessons.

"Some things that teens are going through now maybe I have already been through and I can help them out," Amanda said.

After each poem and Mandi's Minutes there is a Biblical scripture that allows for further thought.

The book also spurs spiritual introspection at the end of each passage. Questions dealing with the section are asked and space is left for readers to write their responses.

"We wanted to minister to people, we didn't want just another book that was trying to make money, we wanted to really help somebody out, "Jackson said.

Amanda said she likes the way her mother uses words that teens understand.

For example, Jackson writes the following as she explains the traps of material items:

"Always flaunting their money ... telling you ... 'Let me show you what I got.' I had one tell me, 'if you be my girl, I'll buy you a diamond ring' ­ Appealing to the eyes ... They think young ladies like to 'bling-bling!'"

"She's kind of cool," Amanda said of her mother. "Maybe she doesn't know but I view her as a role model."

Jackson started her own publishing company for this project and is planning to write a second book. She also hopes to publish other books by religious authors.

The mother-daughter writing duo will have a book signing from 2 to 4 p.m. July 31 at For His Glory Christian Book Store, 10428 Campus Way South, Upper Marlboro. The cost of the book is $10.95.