Accused stabber at Bethesda mall held without bail -- Gazette.Net


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The 24-year-old Potomac man who prosecutors say stabbed a man and woman Thursday afternoon in a fit of road rage in the Westfield Montgomery Mall parking lot in Bethesda was denied bail Friday.

In his bail review, David B. Goldberg listened from jail via a closed-circuit video-recording system, his head bowed and hands folded in front of him, as Montgomery County District Court Judge Gary G. Everngam listed the charges against him.

Prosecutors have charged Goldberg, of Milbern Drive in Potomac, with two counts each of attempted first-degree murder, first-degree assault and second-degree assault; and three counts of reckless endangerment.

The maximum penalty for the most egregious offense, attempted first-degree murder, is life in prison.

When asked if he had received a list of the charges, Goldberg replied simply, “Yes, sir, I did.”

Police arrested Goldberg on Thursday, shortly after the incident.

According to Robert Hill, an assistant state’s attorney, Goldberg, who was driving a gray Mitsubishi Lancer with his young daughter in the back seat, drove through a stop sign on a mall access road and cut in front of a car containing four people — a couple from Potomac, a young child and an older woman — that was on Motor City Drive.

The couple — a man, 31, and a woman, 28 — thought he was driving recklessly and the driver honked his horn at Goldberg, who then swore at them, according to his charging documents.

They followed Goldberg and the couple got out of their car to approach him, but Goldberg sped away.

The couple then parked near Sears and got out of their car to enter the mall, Hill said.

“For them, this unfortunate event was over,” Hill said.

But moments later, Goldberg “revved his engine at a high rate of speed and took off, and drove directly at these people,” Hill said.

Goldberg then either lost control of his car or intentionally drove his car over a curb and into another car, he said.

Goldberg, Hill said, then got out of his car and drew a knife. He began fighting with the man from the other car, stabbed him in the back and cut him on his right arm and left cheek.

The woman from the other car tried to intervene, and at some point in the fight, Goldberg stabbed her in the abdomen, which Hill said caused “life-threatening injuries,” requiring immediate surgery.

Dennis Hines of Bethesda, the owner of the other car that Goldberg allegedly plowed into, told The Gazette he came out of the mall to find “two bloody people” and his car “smashed from the back and pushed out of its parking space.”

Police soon found Goldberg outside of a California Pizza Kitchen on the upper level of the mall parking garage, along with his daughter, 2. The knife he allegedly used in the attack was still in his car, according to his charging documents.

“This was a very serious case of road rage ... he’s demonstrated he’s a danger to the public,” Hill said.

The woman is in a local hospital and unlikely to be released for at least four to five days, he said.

Hill also said Goldberg had been the subject of a peace order in 2010 and owned swords and other weapons in his house, a statement that caused Goldberg to begin emphatically shaking his head.

Goldberg, who lives with his mother in Potomac, said little during the hearing. A half-dozen relatives appeared in court but declined to speak to reporters after the bail review.

Goldberg’s attorney, Paul Chung, had asked for reasonable bail, saying Goldberg was not a flight risk or danger to anyone else and didn’t have a criminal history.

“As tragic as it appears ... based on statement of probable cause prepared by the Montgomery County Police Department, it’s clear that Goldberg drove away on two prior occasions,” Chung said, adding that he believed a different version of events would come to light as the case progressed.

Chung said Goldberg worked two jobs and earned his GED diploma in 2007.

He also said that while in jail, Goldberg had been unable to take his presciption medications.

“There appears to be no motivation for what occurred here,” Everngam said, denying bail.

Goldberg has a preliminary hearing scheduled for Dec. 5.

sjbsmith@gazette.net