The article requested cannot be found! Please refresh your browser or go back. (PN,20130503,NEWS,130509459,AR). Popular Montgomery teacher, coach resigns mid-year -- Gazette.Net


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This story was updated at 3 p.m. May 7, 2013.

A well-known, well-decorated precalculus teacher and wrestling coach in Montgomery County has resigned mid-year.

Jacob Scott, a teacher at Montgomery Blair High School in Silver Spring, resigned April 23, according to Brian Edwards, the school system’s chief of staff.

Scott said by phone Friday that he resigned to pursue his own business ventures of “promoting youth education,” but he acknowledged that rumors are going around saying otherwise.

Scott, who said he worked for the school system for 17 years, was not at school for weeks before he told one of his players on the wrestling team that he was leaving the school.

Sheri S. Verdonk, Blair’s PTSA president, said Friday she knew from Principal Renay Johnson that Scott had been on “an extended leave,” but she was not aware that he had resigned.

In an email, Edwards would not confirm Scott had been placed on leave before he resigned.

Scott recently received local and national media attention for his rapping-teaching technique, which he broadcast on his YouTube channel. He has been featured in a Reebok promotional video and on NPR. The Gazette first featured him in a November 2010 story and then again in January.

Scott said he is not able to talk legally about what happened, but he said he doubts he will return to the classroom.

“My services are better spent outside the classroom,” Scott said.

Scott said rumors include that he changed student test scores, that he plagiarized videos and that he put students in videos without parental consent.

“If I went around trying to address rumors — I have a full-time job. I don’t have time for that,” Scott said. “I’m going to focus on my company and move forward.”

Scott said he has nothing to hide, and he has a clear conscience.

“I’m sure that those who know the full story will be very careful what they say,” he said.

Edwards said the school system could not speak about the reason for Scott’s resignation, stating that it was a personnel matter.

Scott still has his teaching certification. The Maryland State Department of Education has not received a request to void the certification, said state spokesman William Reinhard.

Scott was last hired by the school system in January 2007, according to school system records. This school year, he was making $85,285.

Doug Prouty, president of the Montgomery County Education Association, the county’s teachers union, said Tuesday that Scott reached out to the union for support within the last month.

“We provided him advice and support on some matters, and some matters he pursued on his own,” Prouty said.

Prouty said most teachers who leave in the middle of the school year discuss it with the union beforehand.

Scott received the 2011 NAACP-MCPS Teacher of the Year Award.

In the school system’s staff bulletin about the award, it said that Scott was dedicated to inspiring students of all backgrounds and abilities, especially students who speak English as a second language.

“He creates an environment to engage and motivate students and encourage them to master coursework and succeed in school,” the bulletin states.

jbondeson@gazette.net