Army to release results of Forest Glen studies -- Gazette.Net


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The Army will release new details on two potentially contaminated sites at the Forest Glen Annex in Silver Spring.

The details will be released at a meeting of the Restoration Advisory Board, at 6:30 p.m. Feb. 7, at the Gwendolyn E. Coffield Community Center on Lyttonsville Road in Silver Spring. The meeting is open to the public.

The board — which comprises representatives from the Army, the Maryland Department of the Environment, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, local government officials and community members — was formed as a forum for the public to voice concerns about the sites.

The Army conducted a remedial investigation on the location known as Site Two, the ballfield/helipad/rubble dump site, and a status update on field investigations at Site Six, a chemical-contamination site just north of Linden Lane. These two sites will be the topic of conversation at Thursday’s Restoration Advisory Board meeting.

The Army has said that waste dating to the 1940s by the Walter Reed Army Medical Center could be on the military installation’s site in Silver Spring. Six sites on the annex have been identified as areas for review, including three landfills, a car-wash area, the site of an oil leak and a streambed contaminated with suspected carcinogens.

The landfill site is one of three possible dump locations, according to Army fact sheets. Dumping likely began at these sites in the 1940s and continued into the early 1970s. Though it is unclear what they contain, the Army believes the sites might include medical waste, as well as construction debris, incinerator ash, household refuse and office waste.

Site Six, possibly contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, between the Beltway and Linden Lane, was found in 2005 and 2006. The PCB chemical, a suspected carcinogen, is often used in transformers, insecticides and coolant fluid.

At their Dec. 6 meeting, the Army presented the first round of remedial test results for Site One, a petroleum release site. Contractors recommended that no remedial action would need to be taken.

scarignan@gazette.net, krose@gazette.net