Group alleges that two dead people might have voted in Maryland -- Gazette.Net


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A Maryland group with ties to a tea party organization says it has found two cases of “apparent” votes cast by dead people in examining information on 35,000 registered voters in the state.

The group, Election Integrity Maryland, also said Monday it had identified three people that it thinks were registered to vote after their deaths.

The group also said 1,566 names of deceased people still were on voter rolls.

“Of these names, apparently two voted and three registered to vote after their deaths,” the group said in its statement.

“There is still time to clean up our voter rolls in this state before the November election,” said Cathy Kelleher, president of Election Integrity Maryland. “Indeed, they need to be clean before early voting starts on Oct. 27. Time is of the essence.”

Election officials use the state’s official death records to move someone off the voter rolls.

While election officials take every complaint seriously and will look into the group’s claims, the issue could be as simple as a clerical error and not a sign of voter fraud, said Montgomery County elections board spokeswoman Marjorie Roher.

“I just tried to run it out on my calculator, and it doesn’t go out that far. That is a small percentage,” Roher said. “I don’t want to sound flip about that because we do make every effort to not make any mistakes.”

Mary Cramer Wagner, director of voter registration for the Maryland State Board of Elections, has said irregularities in the voter rolls that the group claims to have found were being reviewed. But, she added, the group uses a different methodology from the election boards.

Election boards are required by federal and state law to take specific steps before removing someone from voter rolls. They include receiving an official death notice or making repeated attempts to verify a person’s address, she said.

cford@gazette.net